India Product

Kusamox Tablets

Kusamox Tablets

Why you have been prescribed this medicine?

You have been prescribed this medicine if you have any of the following:
• Acute bacterial sinusitis (adequately diagnosed)
• Acute otitis media
• Acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (adequately diagnosed)
• Community acquired pneumonia
• Cystitis
• Pyelonephritis
• Skin and soft tissue infections in particular cellulitis, animal bites, severe dental abscess with spreading cellulitis.
• Bone and joint infections, in particular osteomyelitis.

Consideration should be given to official guidance on the appropriate use of antibacterial agents.


What to do if you miss a dose?

If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the dose you missed and take your next dose when you are meant to. Otherwise take it as soon as you remember and then go back to taking it as you would normally.

You should consult your doctor if you experience any of the following:

You should consult your doctor if you experience any of the following:
The most commonly reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting.
The ADRs derived from clinical studies and post-marketing surveillance with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, sorted by MedDRA System Organ Class are listed below. The following terminologies have been used in order to classify the occurrence of undesirable effects.
Very common (≥1/10)
Common (≥1/100 to <1/10)
Uncommon (≥1/1,000 to <1/100)
Rare (≥1/10,000 to <1/1,000)

Infections and infestations

Mucocutaneous candidosis

Common

Overgrowth of non-susceptible organisms

Not known

Aseptic meningitis

Not known

Blood and lymphatic system disorders

Reversible leucopenia (including neutropenia)

Rare

Thrombocytopenia

Rare

Reversible agranulocytosis

Not known

Haemolytic anaemia

Not known

Prolongation of bleeding time and prothrombin time1

Not known

Cardiac Disorders

Kounis sindrome

Not known

Immune system disorders10

Angioneurotic oedema

Not known

Anaphylaxis

Not known

Serum sickness-like syndrome

Not known

Hypersensitivity vasculitis

Not known

Nervous system disorders

Dizziness

Uncommon

Headache

Uncommon

Reversible hyperactivity

Not known

Convulsions2

Not known

Gastrointestinal disorders

Diarrhoea

Very common

Nausea3

Common

Vomiting

Common

Indigestion

Uncommon

Antibiotic-associated colitis4

Not known

Black hairy tongue

Not known

Hepatobiliary disorders

Rises in AST and/or ALT5

Uncommon

Hepatitis6

Not known

Cholestatic jaundice6

Not known

Cholangitis

Not known

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders7

Skin rash

Uncommon

Pruritus

Uncommon

Urticaria

Uncommon

Erythema multiforme

Rare

Stevens-Johnson syndrome

Not known

Toxic epidermal necrolysis

Not known

Bullous exfoliative-dermatitis

Not known

Acute generalized exanthemous pustulosis (AGEP)9

Not known

Renal and urinary disorders

Interstitial nephritis

Not known

Crystalluria8

Not known

1 See section Precautions
2 See section Precautions
3 Nausea is more often associated with higher oral doses. If gastrointestinal reactions are evident, they may be reduced by taking amoxicillin/clavulanic acid at the start of a meal
4 Including pseudomembranous colitis and haemorrhagic colitis (see section Precautions)
5 A moderate rise in AST and/or ALT has been noted in patients treated with beta-lactam class antibiotics, but the significance of these findings is unknown.
6 These events have been noted with other penicillins and cephalosporins (see section Precautions).
7 If any hypersensitivity dermatitis reaction occurs, treatment should be discontinued (see section Precautions)
8 See section Precautions.
9 See section Precautions.
10 See sections contra indication and Precautions.

Things you MUST NOT DO while on this medicine?

Before initiating therapy with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, careful enquiry should be made concerning previous hypersensitivity reactions to penicillins, cephalosporins or other beta-lactam agents (see sections 4.3 and 4.8).
Serious and occasionally fatal hypersensitivity (anaphylactoid) reactions have been reported in patients on penicillin therapy. These reactions are more likely to occur in individuals with a history of penicillin hypersensitivity and in atopic individuals. If an allergic reaction occurs, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid therapy must be discontinued and appropriate alternative therapy instituted.
In the case that an infection is proven to be due to an amoxicillin-susceptible organism(s) then consideration should be given to switching from amoxicillin/clavulanic acid to amoxicillin in accordance with official guidance.
This presentation of Co-amoxiclav is not suitable for use when there is a high risk that the presumptive pathogens have reduced susceptibility or resistance to beta-lactam agents that is not mediated by beta-lactamases susceptible to inhibition by clavulanic acid. This presentation should not be used to treat penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae.
Convulsions may occur in patients with impaired renal function or in those receiving high doses (see sections 4.8).
Amoxicillin/Clavulanic acid should be avoided if infectious mononucleosis is suspected since the occurrence of a morbilliform rash has been associated with this condition following the use of amoxicillin.
Concomitant use of allopurinol during treatment with amoxicillin amoxicillin can increase the likelihood of allergic skin reactions.
Prolonged use may occasionally result in overgrowth of non-susceptible organisms.
The occurrence at the treatment initiation of a feverish generalised erythema associated with pustula may be a symptom of acute generalised exanthemous pustulosis (AGEP) (see section 4.8). This reaction requires Co-amoxiclav discontinuation and contra-indicates any subsequent administration of amoxicillin.
Amoxicillin/Clavulanic acid should be used with caution in patients with evidence of hepatic impairment (see sections 4.2, 4.3 and 4.8).
Hepatic events have been reported predominantly in males and elderly patients and may be associated with prolonged treatment. These events have been very rarely reported in children. In all populations, signs and symptoms usually occur during or shortly after treatment but in some cases may not become apparent until several weeks after treatment has ceased. These are usually reversible. Hepatic events may be severe and, in extremely rare circumstances, deaths have been reported. These have almost always occurred in patients with serious underlying disease or taking concomitant medications known to have the potential for hepatic effects (see section 4.8).
Antibiotic-associated colitis has been reported with nearly all antibacterial agents including amoxicillin and may range in severity from mild to life threatening (see section 4.8). Therefore, it is important to consider this diagnosis in patients who present with diarrhoea during or subsequent to the administration of any antibiotics. Should-antibiotic associated colitis occur, Co-amoxiclav should immediately be discontinued, a physician be consulted and an appropriate therapy initiated. Anti-peristaltic medicinal products are contra-indicated in this situation.
Periodic assessment of organ system functions, including renal, hepatic and haematopoietic function is advisable during prolonged therapy.
Prolongation of prothrombin time has been reported rarely in patients receiving amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Appropriate monitoring should be undertaken when anticoagulants are prescribed concomitantly. Adjustments in the dose of oral anticoagulants may be necessary to maintain the desired level of anticoagulation (see section 4.5 and 4.8).
In patients with renal impairment, the dose should be adjusted according to the degree of impairment (see section 4.2).
In patients with reduced urine output, crystalluria has been observed very rarely, predominantly with parenteral therapy. During the administration of high doses of amoxicillin, it is advisable to maintain adequate fluid intake and urinary output in order to reduce the possibility of amoxicillin crystalluria. In patients with bladder catheters, a regular check of patency should be maintained (see section 4.9).
During treatment with amoxicillin, enzymatic glucose oxidase methods should be used whenever testing for the presence of glucose in urine because false positive results may occur with non-enzymatic methods.
The presence of clavulanic acid in Co-amoxiclav may cause a non-specific binding of IgG and albumin by red cell membranes leading to a false positive Coombs test.
There have been reports of positive test results using the Bio-Rad Laboratories Platelia Aspergillus EIA test in patients receiving amoxicillin/clavulanic acid who were subsequently found to be free of Aspergillus infection. Cross-reactions with non-Aspergillus polysaccharides and polyfuranoses with Bio-Rad Laboratories Platelia Aspergillus EIA test have been reported. Therefore, positive test results in patients receiving amoxicillin/clavulanic acid should be interpreted cautiously and confirmed by other diagnostic methods.
Influence on velocity reactions while driving motor transport and operating other mechanisms:
No studies on the effects on the ability to drive and use machines have been performed. However, undesirable effects may occur (e.g. allergic reactions, dizziness, convulsions), which may influence the ability to drive and use machines.

What to do if you accidentally take too much (overdose) of the medicine?

Before initiating therapy with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, careful enquiry should be made concerning previous hypersensitivity reactions to penicillins, cephalosporins or other beta-lactam agents (see sections 4.3 and 4.8).
Serious and occasionally fatal hypersensitivity (anaphylactoid) reactions have been reported in patients on penicillin therapy. These reactions are more likely to occur in individuals with a history of penicillin hypersensitivity and in atopic individuals. If an allergic reaction occurs, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid therapy must be discontinued and appropriate alternative therapy instituted.
In the case that an infection is proven to be due to an amoxicillin-susceptible organism(s) then consideration should be given to switching from amoxicillin/clavulanic acid to amoxicillin in accordance with official guidance.
This presentation of Co-amoxiclav is not suitable for use when there is a high risk that the presumptive pathogens have reduced susceptibility or resistance to beta-lactam agents that is not mediated by beta-lactamases susceptible to inhibition by clavulanic acid. This presentation should not be used to treat penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae.
Convulsions may occur in patients with impaired renal function or in those receiving high doses (see sections 4.8).
Amoxicillin/Clavulanic acid should be avoided if infectious mononucleosis is suspected since the occurrence of a morbilliform rash has been associated with this condition following the use of amoxicillin.
Concomitant use of allopurinol during treatment with amoxicillin amoxicillin can increase the likelihood of allergic skin reactions.
Prolonged use may occasionally result in overgrowth of non-susceptible organisms.
The occurrence at the treatment initiation of a feverish generalised erythema associated with pustula may be a symptom of acute generalised exanthemous pustulosis (AGEP) (see section 4.8). This reaction requires Co-amoxiclav discontinuation and contra-indicates any subsequent administration of amoxicillin.
Amoxicillin/Clavulanic acid should be used with caution in patients with evidence of hepatic impairment (see sections 4.2, 4.3 and 4.8).
Hepatic events have been reported predominantly in males and elderly patients and may be associated with prolonged treatment. These events have been very rarely reported in children. In all populations, signs and symptoms usually occur during or shortly after treatment but in some cases may not become apparent until several weeks after treatment has ceased. These are usually reversible. Hepatic events may be severe and, in extremely rare circumstances, deaths have been reported. These have almost always occurred in patients with serious underlying disease or taking concomitant medications known to have the potential for hepatic effects (see section 4.8).
Antibiotic-associated colitis has been reported with nearly all antibacterial agents including amoxicillin and may range in severity from mild to life threatening (see section 4.8). Therefore, it is important to consider this diagnosis in patients who present with diarrhoea during or subsequent to the administration of any antibiotics. Should-antibiotic associated colitis occur, Co-amoxiclav should immediately be discontinued, a physician be consulted and an appropriate therapy initiated. Anti-peristaltic medicinal products are contra-indicated in this situation.
Periodic assessment of organ system functions, including renal, hepatic and haematopoietic function is advisable during prolonged therapy.
Prolongation of prothrombin time has been reported rarely in patients receiving amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Appropriate monitoring should be undertaken when anticoagulants are prescribed concomitantly. Adjustments in the dose of oral anticoagulants may be necessary to maintain the desired level of anticoagulation (see section 4.5 and 4.8).
In patients with renal impairment, the dose should be adjusted according to the degree of impairment (see section 4.2).
In patients with reduced urine output, crystalluria has been observed very rarely, predominantly with parenteral therapy. During the administration of high doses of amoxicillin, it is advisable to maintain adequate fluid intake and urinary output in order to reduce the possibility of amoxicillin crystalluria. In patients with bladder catheters, a regular check of patency should be maintained (see section 4.9).
During treatment with amoxicillin, enzymatic glucose oxidase methods should be used whenever testing for the presence of glucose in urine because false positive results may occur with non-enzymatic methods.
The presence of clavulanic acid in Co-amoxiclav may cause a non-specific binding of IgG and albumin by red cell membranes leading to a false positive Coombs test.
There have been reports of positive test results using the Bio-Rad Laboratories Platelia Aspergillus EIA test in patients receiving amoxicillin/clavulanic acid who were subsequently found to be free of Aspergillus infection. Cross-reactions with non-Aspergillus polysaccharides and polyfuranoses with Bio-Rad Laboratories Platelia Aspergillus EIA test have been reported. Therefore, positive test results in patients receiving amoxicillin/clavulanic acid should be interpreted cautiously and confirmed by other diagnostic methods.
Influence on velocity reactions while driving motor transport and operating other mechanisms:
No studies on the effects on the ability to drive and use machines have been performed. However, undesirable effects may occur (e.g. allergic reactions, dizziness, convulsions), which may influence the ability to drive and use machines.

Is it safe in pregnancy and breast-feeding?

Pregnancy
Animal studies do not indicate direct or indirect harmful effects with respect to pregnancy, embryonal/foetal development, parturition or postnatal development (see section 5.3). Limited data on the use of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid during pregnancy in humans do not indicate an increased risk of congenital malformations. In a single study in women with preterm, premature rupture of the foetal membrane it was reported that prophylactic treatment with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid may be associated with an increased risk of necrotising enterocolitis in neonates. Use should be avoided during pregnancy, unless considered essential by the physician.

Lactation
Both substances are excreted into breast milk (nothing is known of the effects of clavulanic acid on the breast-fed infant). Consequently, diarrhoea and fungus infection of the mucous membranes are possible in the breast-fed infant, so that breast-feeding might have to be discontinued.
Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid should only be used during breast-feeding after benefit/risk assessment by the physician in charge.

 

Storage Conditions:

Store in a dry, protected from light place at a temperature not more than 30oC.
Keep it out of reach of children.

Drug Description

Active substance: amoxicillin, clavulanic acid.

Each film-coated tablet contains amoxicillin trihydrate equivalent to 500 mg amoxicillin with potassium clavulanate equivalent to 125 mg clavulanic acid.

Additional ingredients: MCC, Cross Carmellose Sodium, Colloidal Anhydrous Silicon, Magnesium Stearate. Purified Talc

 

Indications and dosage.

Indications:

Kusamox is indicated for the treatment of the following infections in adults and children:
• Acute bacterial sinusitis (adequately diagnosed)
• Acute otitis media
• Acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (adequately diagnosed)
• Community acquired pne